PREGNANCY AND LUPUS: NOT EASY!

By | June 11, 2021
PREGNANCY AND LUPUS NOT EASY!

Good morning everyone! Today I am going to tell you a very interesting topic for lupus in general, since about 9 out of 10 people with lupus are women. If I was this far from my blog, it wasn’t because I was sick of it or had more time. Simply, many events have followed one another over the past year, and not the happiest.

I found out about my pregnancy at the end of 2011. Obviously it was wanted, no nudge in sight. I only had ultrasounds until 22 / 23NW every 2 weeks as my anti-SSA body is positive that it can affect the baby’s heart. After 22NT it is to the end of each month. At 24SA, I had a routine ultrasound. I was told that the baby had not grown at all since the last ultrasound (which was 2 weeks ago) and that there was not a drop of amniotic fluid left.

They send me home, just telling me that hoping for no improvement for such a short term would not move and that the IMG should be considered. But 2 days later I have severe upper abdominal pain. There I go to the maternity ward where I was followed and they send me home and tell me it’s nothing. I had a tension 14/9, beyond that we act, until 14/9 we don’t do anything!

I had this pain for almost a week that prevented me from living properly: for example, I couldn’t even press the accelerator on the car.

I go back to the emergency room in the maternity ward at 11 a.m. and don’t go out any more. At 10 p.m. I am told that I have preeclampsia, hence the 21/9 tension, and that I also have HELLP syndrome:

my kidneys stopped working (I stopped urinating), neither did my liver (I was yellow from head to toe), I had thrombocytopenia (platelets had dropped to 15,000) my motherhood can’t do anything for me (level 3 anyway) and one of the most famous by the way), they transferred me somewhere else around midnight.

At 7 o’clock in the morning I was brought to the emergency services of the mother for a caesarean section. Our daughter, my partner and I decided not to intubate when giving birth because she had absolutely no chance, her growth retardation was extremely strong.

Over time, I learned that my pregnancy caused the development of anti-phospholipid antibodies that I had never had before. This resulted in multiple microthrombosis of the placenta, causing it to enlarge and prevent the baby from developing any further.

As a result, these antibodies are negative. I was warned: 1 to 2 years no pregnancy, and there. I became pregnant 3 months later through a contraceptive accident. The doctor who gave me a caesarean section saw no incognito in the continuation of this pregnancy. However, more follow-up visits have been done, including daily day clinics and shock treatments, as antiphospholipid antibodies are always present during pregnancy!

I still had high blood pressure 3 weeks before the planned caesarean section, but it never got as far as the first time (maximum 16/9).

So my balance sheet:

I don’t want to scare anyone, but I’m pretty fatalistic in general, not particularly because of my health, it’s my character. In conclusion, I would like to say that pregnancy with lupus is not without its risks, even in remission.

Obviously, we’re more likely to have a pregnancy that ends when we’re in remission. But in my case there was absolutely no pressure and the spell was tough. Well at the moment I am strictly forbidden to get pregnant within 2 to 3 years especially for my body / health! So be careful

The professor who took him to caesarean section for both pregnancies was always very personable. He even came to visit the maternity ward one morning. I wouldn’t hesitate for a second to follow me again if there was a future pregnancy.

PS: I didn’t write this article to scare or complain. Basically this blog was crazy where I was telling about my life, my daily life with lupus, even if the topic is not very gay, neither is it taboo not to talk about it. I’m neither the first nor the last to suffer this, and if the ending of this story can comfort more than one, I would be more than happy!

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